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  • Teaneck Holocaust memorial moves forward
    A plan to erect a Holocaust memorial in front of the Teaneck municipal building received a go-ahead from the town council Tuesday night. Get The Jewish Standard's Daily Edition by email and never miss our top stories FREE SIGN UP! The plan would pair the memorial with one commemorating the plight of enslaved Africans. The approval is a milestone in a three-year effort by the Teaneck Holocaust Memorial Committee. It paves the way for township officials to begin drafting the necessary legal documents. “I want to commend you for working together on this project,” Teaneck Mayor Lizette Parker told the two memorial committees. The council heard from the Holocaust memorial’s new architect, Alan Hantman. Mr. Hantman, a 25-year resident of Teaneck who now lives in Fort Lee, was appointed by President Bill Clinton as the chief architect of the U.S. Capitol. In his new design, he focused on how to integrate the proposed memorials with each other and with the municipal green’s existing World War II memorial — and, as requested by the council, leaving open the possibility of adding more memorials at some other time. Mr. Hantman’s design uses hedges to delineate each memorial, and to link them with each other. “Each of the areas get their mutual respect,” he said. “We have not interfered with any of the existing memorial trees.” While the Holocaust monument’s design has not yet been determined, Mr. Hantman envisions benches around it, with enough space to allow 20 or 25 people to sit. Behind the benches would be something he calls “reading rails,” which would provide information about the Holocaust, perhaps linking to online resources. “It would be great if we could have a whole syllabus in the schools that would teach both the issues of the enslaved African community and the Holocaust issues and whatever issues we might ultimately have on the municipal green,” he told the council meeting. The outer ring would be made of stones; donors could use those surfaces to memorialize names of family members who died in the Holocaust. This has been a constant element of plans presented by the memorial committee, headed by Steve Fox and Bruce Prince. After the presentation, the council voted to approve the spirit of the proposal and authorize the township’s legal counsel to begin drafting the ordinances that would be required to implement it. Those ordinances will have to be ratified by the council at a future meeting. There were five votes in favor of the proposal, and one abstention. The call to memorialize enslaved Africans had originated in response to earlier discussions of the Holocaust memorial. After council members advised the groups to work together, “We invited representatives from their groups to come and see our presentations,” Mr. Fox said. “They were thrilled.” While Mr. Hantman’s plan does not propose any details for that memorial, it gives them a complementary space and footprint in the municipal green. The Holocaust memorial committee has not yet begun raising money for its memorial. “People are not looking to give money until you have something concrete,” Mr. Fox said. After Tuesday night’s council meeting, the moment of concrete planning has gotten closer.

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  • The entire Teaneck Township Council stands united in the goal of having a Holocaust Memorial built in our community. Every single member of the Teaneck Township Council has joined the consensus that Teaneck should be the site of a memorial to the victims of the Shoah, one that is at a central site and serves as a beacon of the universal message: Never Again. Not To Anyone! At its meeting on January 28, 2015, the Teaneck Township Council expressed its unanimous support for the development of such a memorial, with an overwhelming majority supporting the selection of a site on the Municipal Green. The council understands and accepts the critical importance of having a Holocaust Memorial in the township that honors the victims’ and survivors’ families. Just 70 years later, we can see that lessons of the Holocaust are being forgotten or have never been learned, as antisemitism spreads like wildfire across the globe. We feel that it is essential that a memorial be located in the heart of our township. After years of efforts to find an optimal site, we have begun developing a location for an appropriate monument on the Municipal Green. The Municipal Green may not be hallowed ground, but it is an area treated with tremendous and somber respect. It is the site of a memorial to Sara Duker—a victim of terrorism—and a memorial to those who served in the Armed Forces to protect our freedoms and also, to liberate the camps. Teaneck observes Memorial Day and Veteran’s Day with ceremonies on the Green, overseen by our Patriotic Observance Advisory Board, and it is where members of our government are sworn in. The expansive grounds, sheltered by many mature trees, provides an opportunity to have a contemplative experience with appropriate seriousness, far enough away from Cedar Lane and Teaneck Road to buffer noise. Remote locations, without frequent foot traffic and police patrols, cannot guarantee security. The Memorial will be in plain sight, protected by the buildings and foot traffic around it, and maintained by the township. It is located across the street from the Jewish Center of Teaneck, adjacent to Eugene Field School and the public library, as well as the police department, Holy Name Hospital and the convent. Because the Library is just a few hundred feet away, visitors can visit the memorial and the Library to see a permanent exhibit of Holocaust-related artifacts, to attend lectures by survivors and experts in the library auditorium, as well as participating in projects or borrowing books from the collection. The goal is for residents and visitors to internalize that message: Never Again. Not to Anyone! The Town Council members feel that the Green is a more appropriate site for a Holocaust Memorial than the park next door to the DPW, off of two very busy roads, in a flat field, exposed to the harshest elements, that is regularly invaded by Canadian geese and their waste products. Sheltered from the blazing sun and offering an indoor respite from the bitter cold, a monument at the Municipal Green would be usable year-round and would allow for the proper duration of time needed to appreciate the core message of the Township of Teaneck’s Holocaust Memorial. Mayor Lizette Parker Deputy Mayor Elie Y Katz Councilman Jason Castle Councilman Mohammed Hameeduddin Councilman Henry Pruitt Councilman Mark Schwartz Councilman Alan Sohn

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  • Teaneck Holocaust commemoration
    The Jewish Community Council of Greater Teaneck will hold its annual Yom Hashoah observance on Wednesday, May 4, at 7:30 p.m., at Teaneck High School. Helga Marx Silbermann is this year’s keynote speaker. In 1938, 13-year-old Helga and her grandfather ran into their burning shul to rescue a Torah scroll. During the war, she was able to warn Jews destined for death, thus saving many lives. The musical presentation will feature pianist/vocalist Jonathan Rimberg and violinist Stephanie Kurtzman. They will be joined by the Yavneh Academy choirs, directed by Marsha Motzen, for a performance of the Hymn of the Partisans. A reception for survivors and their families will be held in the high school’s media room, beginning at 6 p.m. Light refreshments will be served and Yitzy Glicksman will perform Hebrew and Yiddish music. For information, go to teaneckyomhashoa.org or call Steve Fox at (201) 362-6776. To attend the reception for survivors and their families, call Dena Levie at (917) 334-0937. During May, the Teaneck Public Library will feature Holocaust-inspired artwork by past and present Teaneck High School and Yavneh Academy students. The artwork was exhibited at the Bergenfield Public Library during April.

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  • Teaneck Holocaust Commemoration Is Planned for April 24
    A division of the Jewish Community Council of Greater Teaneck, the Teaneck Holocaust Commemoration Committee was formed over 30 years ago to perpetuate the memories of the Holocaust and to assure that the precious memories of the over six million victims who perished will not be forgotten. In keeping with this mission, every year it has hosted a community-wide commemoration in the impressive Teaneck High School auditorium that attracts 1000 attendees from across Bergen County. Many of those in attendance are children and grandchildren and more recently great-grandchildren of survivors whose numbers are sadly dwindling with each passing year. The committee, which includes over 30 volunteers who work throughout the year to orchestrate this event, is chaired by Steve Fox, Heidi Fuchs and Felicia Grossman, all of Teaneck. The chairs urge survivors and their families to contact them if they wish to serve as candlelighters in future commemorations. A moving and meaningful segment of the program features survivors, accompanied by children and grandchildren and great-grandchildren, whose Holocaust experiences are shared with the audience as they light a memorial candle in memory of the six million. The Yavneh Academy choir, under the direction of Marsha Motzen, will join Jonathan Rimberg and Stephanie Kurtzman for a musical presentation and the national anthem to open the program. The highlight of the yearly commemoration is the address by a survivor selected by the committee from a list of potential speakers. To date, the featured speakers have included individuals whose indomitable faith, will to live, industriousness and creativity have inspired the audience, young and old. Some have been brought in from other countries, including Israel and Canada. Others have created highly regarded names for themselves in business, education and the arts. The keynote speaker at this year’s commemoration, marking the 68th anniversary of the start of the Shoah, will be child survivor Mark Schonwetter. Mark was a child of 6 when his father was taken away by the Nazis. Little Mark was forced into manhood to help his family survive.Through the heroism of his courageous mother, Mark and his young sister fled the only home they had ever known. For three long and dangerous years, they escaped under barbed-wire fences and took refuge in woods, fields and farms. Of the 1,500 Jews who had populated their village, only 50 survived. After the war, the three remaining Schonwetters remained in Poland for 10 years. In 1957 they were able to emigrate to Israel. Unfortunately, Mark was unable to secure proper work in Israel, and so, with five dollars in his pocket, he moved to the US in 1961. Once here, he obtained menial work in a jewelry factory, supervised by a Yiddish-speaking co-worker. Slowly but adamantly, he learned English and rose through the ranks to become the factory manager. Within five years, he purchased another jewelry company called Lieberfarb, which he proceeded to grow into a successful wedding ring and bridal company that he owned and ran for over 40 years. Schonwetter shared, “I feel blessed to have had a lifetime having survived against all odds.” Inspired by her father’s life story and exemplary determination, daughter Ann Arnold has authored a biography of her father entitled, “Together: A Journey of Survival.” Together, father and daughter have made it their mission to spread the story of courage against impossible odds with schoolchildren and adults wherever possible. On the morning after speaking at the Community Commemoration, Schonwetter will address over 500 students of Teaneck High School in keeping with the yearly practice of sharing the featured speaker with the school. Also, in conjunction with the yearly commemoration, the committee arranges for an exhibit of Holocaust artwork by students of local private and public schools. This year, a photographic exhibit by noted photographer Debbie Teicholz Guedalia is being hosted at the Teaneck Public Library throughout April and the Bergenfield Public Library throughout May. The community is urged to participate in the commemoration and to bring the younger generations along so that the memories of the kedoshim will be perpetuated in an honorable program. Teaneck High School is located at 100 Elizabeth Avenue, Teaneck, NJ 07666. For more information, visit www.teaneckyomhashoa.org/calendar By Pearl Markovitz

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  • Teaneck Holocaust Memorial Granted Final Approval
    Plans for the Holocaust Memorial to be built on the Teaneck Municipal Green were granted final approval by the Teaneck Township Council last week. The outline is to allow space for two monuments in different sections, one memorializing the Holocaust and the other for enslaved Africans. Both will have the same allocations in their respective sections. The proposal presented to the Council states that each monument would be a maximum of 35x35 feet with surrounding walls no taller than four feet. Each center structure will be at most 10 feet tall. Mr. Alan M. Hantman, FAIA, the 10th Architect of the Capitol appointed by President Clinton, has developed the memorial plans. Hantman lived in Teaneck for 25 years and currently resides with his wife in Fort Lee. In his design, Hantman focused on how to incorporate the Holocaust Memorial with the existing World War II Memorial, while allotting a balanced area for a memorial to commemorate enslaved Africans. The proposed concept creates a sense of unity and harmony, reinforcing the importance of cultural tolerance. The Teaneck Holocaust Commemoration Committee, a division of the Jewish Community Council of Teaneck, was formed to perpetuate the memory of the Holocaust and assure that the memories of the six million Jews who perished will never be forgotten. In collaboration with Mr. Hantman’s design, the committee’s vision for the memorial comprises two goals. The first is to memorialize those who died in the Holocaust. The second is to educate people of all ages about the horrors that defined the Holocaust. “The objective is not just to have a sculpture on the green, but rather a place where people can come together to discuss the Holocaust and reflect on what it was about,” Mr. Hantman told the Jewish Link. The outer perimeter of the memorial will be adorned with stones that can be inscribed with names of those killed in the Holocaust for about $360 each. Larger sponsorship opportunities will be available as well. Funds raised will help support the project as well as assist in maintaining the memorial. There is also a large educational component involved in the production of this memorial. Architecturally, the plan is designed to have benches surrounding the monument that feature a reading rail containing educational material. This will be an interactive website that will allow visitors to access a wealth of information while at different parts of the memorial through an app that can be downloaded to a phone or tablet. Creating a video archive of local survivors is being considered. Testimonials from actual survivors or family members living locally will offer a unique appeal to the exhibit, fostering a feeling of closeness among community members. Also in discussion is the potential to create a synergy with the Teaneck Library, just steps away, so that visiting groups can go into the library after touring the memorial and gain a greater understanding about the Holocaust. Committees for both the Holocaust Memorial and the Enslaved Africans Memorial emphasized the mutual priority of enhancing the importance and stature of the Municipal Green. “This is an effort to create a sacred space and give honor to the municipal green,” Councilman Alan Sohn said. “These memorials provide an opportunity to residents of Teaneck to learn about the events of our history.” Council members as a whole commended both groups for working in such a unified manner to achieve something so meaningful. “The objective is to have these two memorials work together in a way that puts Teaneck on the multicultural map again,” added Councilman Henry Pruitt. As she prepared to announce a ceremonial vote, Mayor Lizette Parker said, “Approval for this Memorial Plan is a long time in coming and I am happy it is coming to fruition.” All council members voted unanimously in favor of approving plans for the memorial project. Approval of plans to proceed with the construction of the memorial comes just weeks prior to Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day. Steve Fox, Co-Chair of the Holocaust Commemoration Committee expressed to the Jewish Link, “The Township took a major step in working with us to create our Holocaust Memorial on the Municipal Green along with the group who will be memorializing the enslaved Africans. We hope that these exhibits not only remember those who died but serve as an educational beacon in the community where young and old can learn about these tragedies and appreciate the importance of tolerance and brotherhood. We plan to make our memorial educationally stimulating and emotionally meaningful and look forward to communal support in making this a reality.” Bruce Prince, co-chair of The Holocaust Committee, conveyed his immense gratitude to those who have helped make this a reality. “The Holocaust Memorial Committee has been working for over three years to provide a place to pay homage of those lost in the Holocaust. Its intention is to continue to tell the story that otherwise may be lost, as the numbers of survivors diminish. The process of creating and building such a memorial and education center has been arduous. Our committee has begun working with the African American Enslavement committee and both groups will be able to tell their stories on the Municipal Town Green, with independent structures and education facilities. Representing the two largest ethnic populations, accounting for 40 percent Jewish population and 26 percent of African Americans, it is fitting that such a collective tell both stories. “Having received unanimous support from the Teaneck Town Council, we are all excited about the next steps,” said Prince. By Andrea Nissel

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  • Holocaust Center Being Considered for Teaneck Park
    TEANECK -- An unused portion of Marie W. Andreas Park on the Hackensack River could become the site of what officials believe would be Bergen County's first Holocaust memorial and center focusing on genocide and tolerance. Still in the conceptual phase, the Holocaust Memorial and Center for Tolerance Education would be dedicated to the memory of those who were systematically persecuted and murdered by the German Nazi regime during World War II. The victims included 6 million Jews and others, including Roma, known as Gypsies; Slavs; and the mentally ill and disabled. The monument would include a sunken granite disk, a reflecting pool and benches in a park setting, organizers said. Residents would be able to place bricks or pieces of concrete at the site bearing names of relatives and friends who perished in or survived the Holocaust, said Steve Fox, co-chairman of the Teaneck Holocaust Commemoration Committee and the vice president of the Jewish Community Council of Teaneck. An unused two-story carriage house on the property would be converted into an education center for exhibitions on genocide, racism and prejudice as well as for lectures, said Fox, whose father survived the Warsaw Ghetto uprising and fought with the Jewish resistance before immigrating to the United States in 1949. He died last year at age 89. The number of surviving Holocaust victims is diminishing, prompting organizers to push for the memorial now. In New Jersey, the number of survivors has declined from 4,500 just five years ago, to 1,500 to 1,800 today, said Paul B. Winkler, executive director of the state Commission on Holocaust Education, which supports the Teaneck proposal. Teaneck is also well-suited for another reason: In 1976, the school district was among the first in the state to include Holocaust studies in its curriculum, Winkler said. "In a few years there will be no more eyewitnesses to the tragedies of the Holocaust," Fox told the Township Council when the preliminary site plan and designs were presented on Tuesday. The center will be open to everyone, he said. And the committee planning the memorial is diverse, including not just people of the Jewish faith but Lutherans, Episcopalians, Catholics and Presbyterians as well. "We are envisioning a place that will allow people of all races to come and reflect," Fox said. "A place where people will remember those who have perished. ... A place where people can bring their children to show them who their ancestors were and explain what they went through. A place where groups of students from all over the county can come to reflect on why it's important for every group to shun discrimination and hate and what happens when we let hate go unchecked. …

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  • Holocaust Center accessible through e-mail
    In 1978, Ed Reynolds, then social studies supervisor at Teaneck High School, took steps to ensure that high school students in New Jersey would learn more about genocide, and about the Holocaust in particular. Not only did Reynolds lead a drive to make the teaching of Holocaust studies mandatory in the state, but he created a Holocaust center at the high school and co-authored a curriculum for teaching genocide. Among those inspired by his efforts was Teaneck resident Pearl Markovitz, then a teacher at Bowne High School in Kew Garden Hills, N.Y. Winning approval from her principal to introduce Reynold’s curriculum, she created a year-long elective class, teaching that material for some 18 years. Describing the school as an “inner-city, multi-ethnic” institution, the teacher said some of the students had never heard of the Holocaust. Still, her classes were always full “and the kids rose to the occasion.”“It’s a beautiful curriculum, teenager-friendly,” said Markovitz, noting that “it used so much of what we know to sensitize [students] and bring them into it.” Now a volunteer at the THS Holocaust center, Markovitz is hopeful that the Teaneck facility will become a resource for all members of the community looking to learn more about — or share their own knowledge of – the Holocaust. Goldie Minkowitz, a longtime THS teacher and coordinator of the school’s Holocaust center, told The Jewish Standard that while a room at the high school had long ago been set aside for this purpose, “the original books, posters, and artwork were not in use for many years because the center was being used as office space for many other programs.” “It was very upsetting to those of us who remembered how hard Ed Reynolds and John Chupak worked in the 1980s to set up a special Holocaust and genocide studies center,” she said. Still, she noted, when Angela Davis became principal of the school, “She was totally supportive of the need to find other spaces for these programs as soon as she possibly could.” With the help of students, who pitched in to clean the space, the center was ready for rededication in November. According to Minkowitz, the center greatly benefited from the arrival of Markovitz in the community. Since the new volunteer began spending time there as a reference librarian, “there is someone to guide classes and individuals through the resources,” she said. And now that the e-mail address is operational as well, “we expect many more people to come and visit, and many more volunteers to donate their time and experiences to the students of Teaneck.” Markovitz said she has already received inquiries by e-mail. One family is looking for books about the Warsaw Ghetto; another offered to share the video interview of a family member taped by Steven Spielberg. She will answer each message she receives and will meet with interested individuals on Thursdays, when she is at the school. She will also use e-mail to alert people to resources available through the THS Holocaust Center and publicize the offerings of other Holocaust programs. Markovitz — whose course in Queens included semi-annual Holocaust commemorations featuring survivors — said she will bring in survivors to speak at the Teaneck school as well. “I hope that there will be interest and that it will be busy,” she said. “I especially hope survivors will feel that there’s a place they can come and impart their messages.” Resources will not be limited to the Holocaust but will also touch on other instances of genocide. For example, one speaker Markovitz hopes to welcome is a Rwandan child who survived the slaughter there. The Holocaust center has already received many valuable contributions, she said. Last year, Teaneck sculptor Milton Ohring dedicated an original work in memory of family members killed during the Holocaust. In addition, Jeanette Friedman, a contributor to this paper, and her husband, Philip Sieradski, donated a large collection of autographed books and original material to the center in honor of their parents, who were Holocaust survivors. Minkowitz asks that individuals interested in donating their time and expertise to the center e-mail Markovitz at [email protected]

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  • New York: In a touching display of unity and hope, the annual citywide Remembrance Gathering in Observance of Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day was held at Temple Emanu-El, on Sunday April 21, 2012. The gathering, New York City’s largest and oldest commemoration was organized by The Museum of Jewish Heritage-A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, The Warsaw Ghetto Resistance Organization, (WAGRO), and the American Gathering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors and their Descendants. With close to two thousand people in attendance, the program featured remarks by numerous dignitaries including Consul General of Israel in New York Ido Aharoni, Israeli MK Yossi Peled, Senator Charles Schumer, and Dr. David C. Marwell, Director of the Museum of Jewish Heritage. Remarks were also delivered by Rita Lerner and Ann Oster, who co-chaired the event, Dr. Marcel Tuchman, a Holocaust Survivor, Stacey Saiontz, a granddaughter of Survivors, and Rabbi David M. Posner, senior rabbi of Temple Emanu-el Consul General Ido Aharoni spoke about the eight days of Remembrance and Celebration that takes place after Passover each year. The eight days commence with the Commemoration of Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day and continue with Yom Hazikaron, The Remembrance Day for the Fallen Soldiers of Israel, culminating with Yom Ha’atzmaut, Israel Independence Day. This period carried great emotional significance for both Israel and Diaspora Jewry. It signifies the transition from remembrance and the pain of loss to joy and hope for the future. Israeli Knesset Member and Minister-without-Portfolio Yossi Peled, a Holocaust survivor, graced the gathering with the fascinating story of his past and how he came to become both an Israeli war hero and minister in the Israeli government. Yossi Peled was born Josef Mendlevich in Poland. During WW II his family fled to Begium and his father entrusted him and his sister to a Catholic family. All of Yossi’s family, except his mother, perished in Auschwitz and after the war his mother reclaimed him. Peled related how he met his mother for the first time. How she was broken and looked so emaciated from the Holocaust and how she was determined to rebuild her life and the life of her son and make Aliya to what later became Israel with the assistance of the Jewish Brigade. Peled served in the Israel Defense Forces for over 30 years. He served in both the Six Day War and The Yom Kippur War in command of the famed 205th Armored Brigade which moved from Jerusalem to the Golan Heights and fought against the Syrian Army. His final position was commander of the IDF’s Northern Command which he held until 1991. After numerous business positions, Peled returned to government service within the Likud party and in 2009 he won fifteenth place on the Likud list and entered the Knesset to be appointed a member of Netanyahu’s government. The gathering included very moving ceremonies including a memorial candle lighting by female Holocaust survivors and the lighting of six memorial candles by survivors of the Holocaust and their extended families. It was noted that the survivors were aging and that many are no longer alive. The remaining survivors, many with canes and walkers, were accompanied by their children grandchildren and great grandchildren. Musical selections were delivered by the Temple Emanu-el Choir, Joyce Celnik Levine, coordinator and HaZamir, the International Jewish High School Choir, Matthew Lazar, Founder and Director. The selections included Ani Maamin, Eli Eli and the Jugendt Hymn. In addition, the El Male Rachamim was chanted by Cantor Joseph Malovany of the Fifth Avenue Synagogue, who also sang Moyshelech Shloymelech. The Musical portion of the Program ended with a joint singing by cantor Malovany, HaZamir and the audience of Zog Nit Keyn Mol, the Partisan Hymn. New Jersey: In one of New Jersey’s largest Holocaust commemorations, over 1,100 people turned out on April 19 to remember those who perished as a result of the Nazi genocide. The annual gathering, which took place at Teaneck High School, marks the 32nd year that the event has been presented by the Teaneck Holocaust Commemoration Committee, a division of the Jewish Community Council of Teaneck. On hand to issue a township proclamation, declaring April 15-22nd, Days of Remembrance in memory of those who died in the Holocaust was Teaneck Mayor Mohammed Hameeduddin, who also offered his support for a project initiated by the committee to establish a permanent Holocaust memorial in the Teaneck area. Other dignitaries in attendance included Representative Bill Pascrell, State Senator Loretta Weinberg, Superintendent of Teaneck Schools Barbara Pinsack, Deputy Mayor, Adam Gussen and Township Council members including Elie Katz, Monica Honas and Yitz Stern, who was just appointed to the State Commission on Holocaust Education by Governor Chris Christie. A reception for Holocaust survivors and their families was held prior to the event. Amy Elfman, vice president of the Jewish Community Council of Teaneck, welcomed the large crowd and stated that by coming to this event, they share in the purpose of keeping the memories alive of those who perished. Steve Fox, Co-chair of the Teaneck Holocaust Commemoration Committee, recalled how his late father, a Holocaust survivor who escaped the Warsaw Ghetto and became a fighter in the Russian Partisans, told him that despite losing his parents and relatives, he had the will to survive to tell his story and make sure that his family would have the normal life that his generation was deprived of. Fox told the holocaust survivors in attendance that his generation will never let the world forget the atrocities of the holocaust. The keynote speaker was Dr. Deborah Lipstadt, a noted author, historian and professor of Jewish history at Emery University who spoke about the infamous trial of Adolf Eichmann who was the Nazis’ facilitator of the “Final Solution. He was charged with crimes against Jews and humanity and was the only man ever executed under Israeli law. It was the first time holocaust survivors testified one by one at a war crimes trial and told of the horror that they experienced during the holocaust. She said that the trial of Adolf Eichmann, whose capture in Argentina and subsequently trial was sanctioned by then Israeli Prime Minister, David Ben Gurion, served as a showcase to the world of the crimes of the Nazi machine dedicated to destroying the Jewish people. The evening included moving musical performances by Teaneck residents Meir Fox, who sang the national anthems of Israel and the United States, and by Zalman Mlotek, Artistic Director of the Folksbiene, National Yiddish Theater who along with his sons Elisha and Avram, performed Jewish songs, written during the Holocaust. Psalms were recited by Rabbi Yaakov Neuberger of Congregation Beth Abraham of Bergenfield. The highlight of the evening came when 12 high school students from the Frisch School of Paramus and Maayanot and Torah Academy of Teaneck, who were named after Holocaust victims or survivors, each lit a candle and described who they were named after and what that person meant to them. They were followed by the reading of the family names of victims of the Holocaust whose descendants live in Teaneck, by Rabbi Dr. John Krug and Arline Duker, while 6 groups of candles were being lit by holocaust survivors, their children and grandchildren. Over 2000 victims of the holocaust have descendants in the Teaneck community. The program ended with the recitation of the traditional Kaddish prayer for the dead by Rabbi Yosef Adler of Congregation Rinat Yisrael in Teaneck. In all, it was a meaningful, emotional and educational evening for those in attendance and served as a reminder that by remembering the horrors of the Holocaust, we can be vigilant to help ensure that nothing like it happens again. Photos by Steve Fox

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  • The 34th annual Teaneck Yom Hashoa Commemoration was held on may 4, 2016 at Teaneck High School in front of over 1100 attendees. It featured the gripping story of survival of Helga Marx Silbermann along with music of the Shoa performed by JonathanRimberg, Stephanie Kurtzman anf the Yavneh Academy Choir under the direction of Marsha Greenberg Motzen. Names of "Those Who We Have Lost" were dramatically presented by Rabbi Johnny Krug and Arline Duker while 6 Holocaust Survivors and their families lit candles. A short video introducing the Township's plan to create a Holocaust Memorial to serve the communities of Bergen County was also presented.

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  • NJ Holocaust and Enslaved African Committees
    Members of the Northern NJ Holocaust Memorial & Education Center along with members of the Enslaved African Memorial Committee meeting with State Senator Loretta Weinberg who secured initial funding for both projects

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